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3 edition of Sex differences in obesity rates in poor countries found in the catalog.

Sex differences in obesity rates in poor countries

Case, Anne

Sex differences in obesity rates in poor countries

evidence from South Africa

by Case, Anne

  • 169 Want to read
  • 37 Currently reading

Published by National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, Mass .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Obesity -- Sex differences -- South Africa,
  • Obesity -- Economic aspects -- South Africa

  • About the Edition

    Globally, men and women face markedly different risks of obesity. In all but of handful of (primarily Western European) countries, obesity is more prevalent among women than men. In this paper, we examine several potential explanations for this phenomenon. We analyze differences between men and women in reports and effects of the proximate causes of obesity -- physical exertion and food intake -- and the underlying causes of obesity -- childhood and adult poverty, depression, and attitudes about obesity. We evaluate the evidence for each explanation using data collected in an African township outside of Cape Town. Three factors explain the greater obesity rates we find among women. Women who were nutritionally deprived as children are significantly more likely to be obese as adults, while men who were deprived as children face no greater risk. In addition, women of higher adult socioeconomic status are significantly more likely to be obese, which is not true for men. These two factors can fully explain the difference in obesity rates we find in our sample. Finally (and more speculatively), women"s perceptions of an "ideal" female body are larger than men"s perceptions of the "ideal" male body, and individuals with larger "ideal" body images are significantly more likely to be obese.

    Edition Notes

    StatementAnne Case, Alicia Menendez.
    SeriesNBER working paper series -- working paper 13541., Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research) -- working paper no. 13541.
    ContributionsMenendez, Alicia., National Bureau of Economic Research.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination39 p. :
    Number of Pages39
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17635944M
    OCLC/WorldCa181088287

      High-income countries have greater rates of obesity than middle- and low-income countries (1). Countries that develop wealth also develop obesity; for instance, with economic growth in China and India, obesity rates have increased by several-fold (1). The international trend is that greater obesity tracks with greater wealth (2,3). The U.S. is one of the wealthiest countries in the world and Cited by: Other work: early-life SES & obesity 33 oSouth Africa: Cape Town township, household sample1 o Large gender disparity: 50% women obese, 9% men obese o Extreme childhood poverty: + obesity in women, not men o Measures: hunger, family finances, father employment oDutch famine study: ration cut2 o Follow-up at age 59 years old.

      Childhood and adolescent overweight is a recognized public health concern as the prevalence is already high and continues to increase. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and overweight status by gender among Korean children and adolescents. The data used in this study were taken from the Korean Survey on the Cited by:   Little doubt exists of a worldwide rising trend in body mass index (BMI) and, consequently, in the prevalence of overweight and obesity. The results of a large systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiological studies carried out in countries between and , indicated that, in all but a few countries, the average age-standardised BMI of the adult population (20 years and older Cited by:

    The existing evidence concerning the relationship between education and obesity is relatively limited, as the main focus of most research has been more broadly on the links between socio-economic factors and health status, or longevity, with a smaller number ofFile Size: KB.   Alternate Text: The figure above shows the prevalence of obesity among adults aged ≥20 years, by race/ethnicity and Sex in the United States during , according to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Among adults aged ≥20 years in , % of men and % of women were obese.


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Sex differences in obesity rates in poor countries by Case, Anne Download PDF EPUB FB2

Obesity differences between the sexes appear, instead, to be due to the differences that socioeconomic status have on the probability of obesity. We find that childhood hunger accounts for 11% of the difference in obesity rates between women and men (/). The impact of education accounts for 19% of the difference (/).Cited by: Sex Differences in Obesity Rates in Poor Countries: Evidence from South Africa Anne Case and Alicia Menendez NBER Working Paper No.

October JEL No. D13,I10 ABSTRACT Globally, men and women face markedly different risks of obesity. In all but of handful of (primarily Western European) countries, obesity is more prevalent among women.

Sex Differences in Obesity Rates in Poor Countries: Evidence from Sex differences in obesity rates in poor countries book Africa Anne Case, Alicia Menendez. NBER Working Paper No. Issued in October NBER Program(s):Economics of Aging, Health Economics Globally, men and women face markedly different risks of obesity.

Get this from a library. Sex differences in obesity rates in poor countries: evidence from South Africa. [Anne Case; Alicia Menendez; National Bureau of Economic Research.] -- Globally, men and women face markedly different risks of obesity.

In all but of handful of (primarily Western European) countries, obesity is more prevalent among women than men. Sex Differences in Obesity Rates in Poor Countries: Evidence from South Africa Article in Economics and human biology 7(3) August with Reads How we measure 'reads'.

Downloadable. Globally, men and women face markedly different risks of obesity. In all but of handful of (primarily Western European) countries, obesity is more prevalent among women than men. In this paper, we examine several potential explanations for this phenomenon.

We analyze differences between men and women in reports and effects of the proximate causes of obesity -- physical exertion Cited by: Get this from a library. Sex Differences in Obesity Rates in Poor Countries: Evidence from South Africa.

[Anne Case; Alicia Menendez] -- Globally, men and women face markedly different risks of obesity. In all but of handful of (primarily Western European) countries, obesity is more prevalent among women than men. In this paper, we. Case, A., and A. Menendez. “Sex Differences in Obesity Rates in Poor Countries: Evidence from South Africa.” Economics and Human Biology 7 (3):   When compared to other SSA countries, SA is considered to be further along the nutrition transition, characterised by higher intakes of dietary energy ( kCal above the mean for 39 other SSA countries) and fat intake (% vs sample mean of %), as well as higher levels of obesity than other countries In a study of Kenyan and SA women Cited by: Case A, Menendez A.

Sex differences in obesity rates in poor countries: evidence from South Africa. Econ Hum Biol. ; – Chukwuonye II, Chuku A, John C, et al. Prevalence of. Obesity is defined as a BMI greater than 25 kg/m2. Once thought to simply be a nutritional disorder, obesity has become a major health concern characterized by a state of constant low-grade inflammation caused by chronic adiposity.

This state of inflammation is characterized by circulating inflammatory mediators, such as IL-6, leptin, and TNF-α, as well as varying levels of glucose-regulating Cited by: 1. Continued National Income-Obesity Statistics. Here are the income-obesity statistics for Less than $25, % obese ; $25,$40, % obese.

"Sex differences in obesity rates in poor countries: Evidence from South Africa," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 7(3), pagesDecember.

Anne Case & Alicia Menendez, " Sex Differences in Obesity Rates in Poor Countries: Evidence from South Africa," Working PapersPrinceton University, Woodrow Wilson School of.

The United States and its partners continue to face a growing number of global threats and challenges. The CIA’s mission includes collecting and analyzing information about high priority national security issues such as international terrorism, the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, cyber attacks, international organized crime and narcotics trafficking, regional conflicts.

In most countries, obesity is strongly linked to gender and socioeconomic standing, with poorly educated women two to three times more likely to be overweight than those with more schooling.

Among developed countries, researchers estimated that obesity rates among children and teenagers had recently plateaued at about 10 percent in the UK and about 20 percent in the United States.

Case A, Menendez A. Sex differences in obesity rates in poor countries: evidence from South Africa. Econ Hum Biol. ; PubMedCentral CrossRef PubMed Google Scholar. Obesity soars to 'alarming' levels in developing countries This article is more than 6 years old Almost twice as many obese people in poor countries than in.

Obesity is a leading preventable cause of death worldwide, with increasing rates in adults and children. Inmillion adults (12%) and million children were obese in countries. Obesity is more common in women than men. Authorities view it as one of Diagnostic method: BMI > 30 kg/m².

Obesity and overweight are major health concerns and the leading preventable cause of death in developed and developing countries. Obesity affects men and women differently due to biological, socioeconomic, cultural and country-specific gender-related disparities.

This book chapter outlines obesity as a risk factor for physical diseases and mental health disorders in by: 4. -Sex differences decreased in countries where women had more education and income Men have a higher socioeconomic status than women, and SES is related to health. Is women's poor health a function of their lower income?

ex: Physician bias - perhaps physicians treat women and men differently so it appears women are sicker, but women and men. Morbid Obesity and Quality of Sex Life. His study involved obese men and women -- with an average BMI (body mass index) over BMI is .sub-Saharan Africa.

the most popular form of birth control in poor countries is. throughout the world, fertility rates are ______ in urban areas than they are in rural areas.

of all communicable diseases, the one currently that causes the most deaths worldwide is. respiratory infections. rates of obesity in poor countries have been increasing.